Tag: Mobile

Programming Stuff

iOS/Android/VisualStudio/C#/Xamarin – It’s Looking Up

As you may know, I began digging into Xamarin at the end of last year. It showed a lot of promise as a great way to create cross-platform iOS and Android apps leveraging the existing Visual Studio and C# skills that so many developers have.

When I first started working with it, I did have some initial concerns as I talked about in these 2 blog posts.

I have to say though, once I got past those initial hurdles, things are definitely looking up.

So far I’m doing mostly basic stuff but overall things are going well.

My two main issues are

  1. Visual Studio seems to occasionally have difficulty attaching to the iOS build server
  2. The Visual Studio Android UI designer doesn’t work as well with RelativeLayout as Android Studio does

Neither of these are show-stoppers though.

In the case of connecting to the iOS build server, in most cases restarting Visual Studio takes care of the problem.

For the designer, the Visual Studio designer is workable and if I want to, I can use the Android Studio designer to do the layout work and then just copy it over to the Visual Studio project.

So that’s a long way of saying…

Using Xamarin within Visual Studio is getting a thumbs up so far.

Keep watching as I push on it harder to see how it does as the problem complexity increases.

If you’re interested in doing iOS/Android development with Xamarin, Part 1 of my Pluralsight course series on the topic just went live today…


Programming Stuff

Creating Dynamic UI with Android Fragments gets 5-Star Review

I’m not big on self-promotion but I’ll make an exception as this is an exciting day for me…

My book Creating Dynamic UI with Android Fragments received its first user review on Amazon and its a 5-Star Review

This book is just what I was looking for. The three pieces I was having issues with were static vs. dynamic fragments, dialogue fragments and backstack management. This book covers all three of these in a manner that has really cleared up my understanding and improved my application design as a result.

Thank you to kbp135 – Here’s the link to the review.

And just in case you’re wondering … the reviewer is not someone I know 🙂

Checkout Creating Dynamic UI with Android Fragments for yourself. I’d love to hear your feedback.

Creating Dynamic UI with Fragments


Also checkout Jim’s Android courses at Pluralsight.

Jim's Android courses on Pluralsight

Jim’s Android courses on Pluralsight

Programming Stuff

Android Developers Earn More Money than iOS Developers

According to recent data, senior Android developers average $131,000 per year versus $121,000 for the same skill level on iOS.

That’s some pretty serious cash!

So what are you waiting for … clearly, it’s time to get your Android skills tuned up! 🙂

The full story is available in this Tech Week article.

Checkout Jim”s Android courses on Pluralsight.

Jim's Android courses on Pluralsight

Jim’s latest book, “Creating Dynamic UI with Android Fragments” is now available on amazon.

Creating Dynamic UI with Fragments

Programming Stuff

Android for .NET Developers Series Complete!

Part 4 of my four-part series on Android programming for developers with a .NET background just went live today.



This course delves into the unique features of the Android platform and how those features and the related components affect the way apps are created.

I hope you’ll check out this course and the whole series if you haven’t already seen it. I think you’ll be happy you did.

Here’s the complete series

Part 1: Getting Started

Android for ,NET Developer Series: Getting Started


Part 2: Building Apps with Android Studio

Apps with Android Studio


Part 3: Adopting the Android Mindset



Part 4: Understanding the Android Platform


Programming Stuff

How to Clean an Android Studio Project

You’ve probably noticed that Android Studio doesn’t have a “clean” menu option. But we know that, like any build environment, there are intermediate files created that we may want to occasionally remove.

It turns out the solution is the command line. Simply open a command line in your project’s root folder (Usually named something like MyAppProject) and run the following command

gradlew clean

You’ll see something like this…


Notice that you get a bit of an unexpected message, “BUILD SUCCESSFUL”. This simply indicates that it has gone through and successfully cleaned out the intermediate files. I’ve found that when dealing with larger projects its not uncommon to reduce the amount of disk space used by the project by 70% or more.

So a bit of an unexpected solution (especially for those who’ve been in a Windows environment for a long time) but an easy one.

To learn more about Android programming, checkout Jim’s Android courses on Pluralsight.

Jim's Android courses on Pluralsight

Jim’s latest book, “Creating Dynamic UI with Android Fragments” is now available on amazon.

Creating Dynamic UI with Fragments

Programming Stuff

Creating Dynamic UI with Android Fragments … or…

What I did on my Summer Vacation 🙂

Creating Dynamic UI with Fragments

It’s been a crazy busy Summer. Since May I’ve released 3 new Android courses for Pluralsight with a 4th coming out in a few weeks and wrote a book on Android Fragments titled Creating Dynamic UI with Android Fragments.

I’m excited to announce that the book just became available for pre-order today!!

I need to take a minute to thank my beautiful wife, Bonnie. As you might imagine, I’ve been putting in a lot of hours these past few months and would never have been able to get through it all without her. Her patience and support never end. Bonnie I love you!!

My life is so blessed, I can barely believe it.