Tag: Android software development

Programming Stuff

Android 4.x jumps from 45% of Android devices to nearly 55% overnight

That’s right if you look at the Android Dashboard Charts for the current period (period ending April 2, 2013 as of this writing) you’ll find that the combination of 4.0, 4.1, & 4.2 devices is 54.3%.

AndroidChart_2013-04-02

If you looked at the chart for the previous period you find that same family of devices had only 45% of all Android devices. How does one account for such a huge jump?

Well – one way is to change the way one counts. 🙂

You’ll find the following note on the Android Dashboard Page:

Note: Beginning in April, 2013, these charts are now built using data collected from each device when the user visits the Google Play Store. Previously, the data was collected when the device simply checked-in to Google servers. We believe the new data more accurately reflects those users who are most engaged in the Android and Google Play ecosystem.

So basically .. they now count devices that actually attach to Google Play rather than counting every single device that just happens to wake up periodically and send a heartbeat to the Google servers.

So the cynic might say that Google is skewing things for their own advantage (I’m not saying they’re unhappy with this new way of counting) but I don’t really think that’s the case here.

Honestly, most of us looking at those charts are interested in seeing what versions of the platform we should target with our apps. Those apps are distributed via Google Play … so, I agree that this is the “right way” to count.

For information on creating apps for Android 4.x, checkout Jim’s Pluralsight Course

Android40WhatsNew_350x100

 

Programming Stuff

Android 4.2.2 ADB Device Offline Mystery Solved

As I mentioned in yesterday’s post, I lost the ability to debug code running on my device after upgrading the device to Android 4.2.2. And as mentioned in that post, the solution was to upgrade to the latest Android Platform Tools.

Well … after checking out the Android Debug Bridge (a.k.a. ADB) docs, it turns out that what I experienced is a documented behavior.

Starting with Android 4.2.2 the platform will not allow debugging unless the user is prompted with a dialog box showing an RSA key passed from the connected desktop. This is a new security feature that assures debugging cannot be initiated on the device without a specific acknowledgement from the user.

In order for ADB to successfully make the required exchange to the device you must have a version of ADB that ships with Android Platform Tools r16.0.1 or higher installed (as of this writing the current Android Platform Tools version is r16.0.2).

So it’s a good thing but a bit frustrating when first encountered.